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Sustainability

Sustainability programs and research at U of T Engineering are at the forefront of alternative technologies that can mitigate the impact of climate change.

$67M
in research grants received U of T-wide since 2013
More than half our faculty are engaged in sustainability research
70+
We work with companies on collaborative research focused on sustainability
  • Alternative Fuels
  • Carbon Management
  • Combustion
  • Emissions Reduction
  • Energy Policy
  • Energy Storage
  • Infrastructure Management
  • Life-Cycle Assessment
  • Smart Grid
  • Sustainable Aviation
  • Sustainable Energy
  • Transportation
  • Urban Development

Centre for Power and Information

CPI addresses pressing societal energy challenges at an infrastructural level through fundamental research, industry collaboration, and education, both locally and worldwide. 

BioZone

BioZone advances genome science and genome analysis tools, to provide sound bioengineering solutions to pressing health care challenges.

Institute for Sustainable Energy

ISE is a multidisciplinary research centre that focuses on increasing energy efficiency and reducing the environmental impact of energy use and conversion.

Centre for Research in Sustainable Aviation

CRSA is an interdisciplinary research centre developing future generations of environmentally sustainable aircraft.

Centre for Global Engineering

CGEN prepares engineering graduates for a global workplace and generates high-impact research projects which address development challenges around the world.  

Study Sustainability at U of T Engineering

Our Master of Engineering students can choose from technical specializations in Advanced Water Technologies, Sustainable Energy and Sustainable Aviation. At the undergraduate level, students can pursue minors in Sustainable Energy and Environmental Engineering, and Engineering Science students can major in Energy Systems Engineering.

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Microplastics exist all around us — in the water we drink, the food we eat and the air we breathe. But before researchers can understand the real impact of these particles, they need faster and more effective ways to quantify what is there.  

Two recent U of T Engineering studies have proposed new methods that use machine learning to make the process of counting and classifying microplastics easier, faster and more affordable.  

“It’s really time consuming to analyze a water sample for microplastics,” says Professor Elodie Passeport (CivMin, ChemE). 

“It can take up to 40 hours to fully analyze a sample the size of a mason jar — and that specimen is from one point in time