Skip to Main Content
NewsResearch NewsAdvanced Manufacturing

Advanced Manufacturing

Advanced manufacturing program and research at U of T Engineering are creating next-generation technology while preparing future engineers to lead in industry.

30+
researchers with manufacturing focus
18
research based start-ups created in the past 3 years (U of T wide)
250+
manufacturing industry partners U of T-wide
  • Advanced Aerospace Structures
  • Advanced Coating Technologies
  • Cellular Hybrid Materials
  • Human-Machine Interaction
  • Intelligent Decision Engineering
  • Laser Photonics Fabrication
  • Maintenance Optimization & Reliability Engineering
  • Microcellular Plastics
  • Multifunctional Lightweight Structures
  • Nanomaterials
  • Organic Optoelectronics
  • Robotics & Automation
  • Smart & Multifunctional Materials

Toronto Institute for Advanced Manufacturing

TIAM continues to establish partnerships with the manufacturing sector that maximize the impact of transformative technologies developed by its world-renowned researchers.

Ontario Centre for the Characterization of Advanced Materials

OCCAM fosters collaboration between universities and industry, enabling interactions that traverse the traditional boundaries between science, engineering and medicine.

Institute for Robotics & Mechatronics

IRM conducts research on robotics and mechatronics through collaborative research projects and innovative educational programs.

Centre for Advanced Coating Technologies

CACT conducts fundamental research—experimental, analytical, and computational—in the areas of thermal spray coatings and plasma processing.

Study Advanced Manufacturing at U of T Engineering

Our Master of Engineering students can choose from a wide range of technical emphases including Advanced Manufacturing, while all engineering graduate students have the option of pursuing a Robotics & Mechatronics emphasis. Undergraduates in the Engineering Science program can major in Robotics, while students in our core engineering disciplines can pursue minors in Advanced Manufacturing and Robotics.

Leading innovation starts here

Connect with our partnerships team to discuss how a partnership with U of T Engineering can benefit your organization.

Learn more »

Give a gift

Support the future of advanced manufacturing research.

Learn more

Graphene is a paradox: it is the thinnest material known to science, yet also one of the strongest. Now, research from U of T Engineering shows that graphene is also highly resistant to fatigue — able to withstand more than a billion cycles of high stress before it breaks.

Graphene resembles a sheet of interlocking hexagonal rings, similar to the pattern you might see in bathroom flooring tiles