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Robotics

U of T Engineering has the largest and most diverse robotics program in Canada, and together with a range of strategic industrial partners we are ushering in a future where robots will extend human capabilities and improve lives.

50+
researchers with robotics focus
Largest robotics research program in Canada
$45M+
in total research funding since 2010
  • Advanced Manufacturing
  • Aerial Robotics
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Assistive Robotics
  • Autonomous Vehicles
  • Human Factors and Transportation
  • Machine Learning
  • Microrobotics
  • Nanorobotics
  • Personal Robotics
  • Rehabilitation
  • Robots for Society
  • Surgical Robotics

Centre for Aerial Robotics Research & Education

CARRE expands and unifies research and teaching activities related to the burgeoning field of aerial robotics.

Toronto Institute for Advanced Manufacturing

TIAM expedites research and development of advanced manufacturing technologies by creating a multidisciplinary network focused on sharing knowledge, ideas and resources.

Institute for Robotics & Mechatronics

IRM brings focus to research in robotics and mechatronics through collaborative research projects and innovative educational programs.

Study Robotics at U of T Engineering

Graduate students can choose from a wide range of technical emphases, including Robotics & Mechatronics and Advanced Manufacturing. Engineering undergraduates can complement their studies with minors in Robotics & Mechatronics, Advanced Manufacturing and Nanoengineering. Engineering Science students can major in Robotics as well as Machine Intelligence — the first program of its kind in Canada.

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A team of researchers led by Professor Tim Barfoot (UTIAS) has applied a new strategy for robots to predict the future location of dynamic obstacles, allowing them to navigate spaces without colliding with people. 

The project, which is supported by Apple Machine Learning, will be presented at the International Conference on Robotics and Automation in Philadelphia at the end of May. The results from simulation have also been published in an article on arXiv. 

“The principle of our work is to have a robot predict what people are going to do in the immediate future,” says Dr